One Reply to “TRUTH: Accounting Firms “Bankrupting” ALL CITIES (Deborah Tavares)”

  1. DEBORAH TAVARES & THE ACCOUNTING WILL BANKRUPT CITIES HOAX
    For all other Deborah Tavares hoaxes (NASA, Silent Weapons, Iron Mountain, Agenda 21, Forged PG&E email, genocide), CLICK HERE.
    http://www.oom2.com/t53764-a-summary-of-hoaxes-by-deborah-tavares-by-snoop4truth

    The Press Democrat
    WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2018. Santa Rosa, California. PRESSDEMOCRAT.COM
    [From page 1.]

    SR tapping reserves for fire consultant
    By WILL SCHMIDT
    THE PRESS DEMOCRAT

    Santa Rosa will dig further into its budget reserves to pay an additional $813,000 to the disaster recovery consultant it retained after the October 2017 fires.

    The extension approved by the Santa Rosa City Council last week retains London-based consulting firm Ernst & Young through May and brings the total maximum value of the contract to $2.3 million. The cost of the extension was not included in the city’s current budget forecast, which had estimated Santa Rosa would have $6.5 million in reserves.

    The cost of fire damage and the resulting recovery efforts have eaten into the city’s reserve funding and exacerbated the strain of Santa Rosa’s existing budget deficit, though the city’s funding woes were buoyed somewhat by the passage of a quarter-cent sales tax hike approved by voters in November. That tax increase will take effect in April.

    Ernst & Young, which has an office in San Francisco, was hired in December 2017 to help local officials ASSESS DAMAGE from the 2017 wildfires, REQUEST REIMBURSEMENT from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and REPRESENT THE CITY IN [REIMBURSEMENT] TALKS with FEMA and the California Office Of Emergency Services. Ernst & Young also worked with the city and another outside adviser, Hagerty Consulting, to assess the cities unmet disaster needs, a figure estimated at about $400 million.

    Much of Ernst & Young’s efforts have been behind the scenes, but the city recently revealed an online tracker developed in coordination with the consultant (http:/bit.ly/SRFEMA) REFLECTING THE CITY’S DISASTER RECOVERY REQUESTS [FOR REIMBURSEMENT] to FEMA.

    The city has documented 32 projects with a combined estimated damage of about 66.5 million. FEMA HAS REIMBURSED about $2.8 in disaster costs so far. Ernst & Young will continue to HELP THE CITY APPEAL FOUR REQUESTS [FOR REIMBURSEMENT] for about $17 million that FEMA initially deemed ineligible for reimbursement.

    City Manager Sean McGlynn told the city council last week that the contract extension WOULD BE THE LAST ONE between Santa Rosa and Ernst & Young FOR THIS DISASTER RECOVERY [REIMBURSEMENT] contract. He noted that Santa Rosa’s efforts TO SECURE REIMBURSEMENT be far from finished once the contract is up.

    “There is going to be a huge amount of time and energy spent by staff in managing this.” McGlynn said.

    THE CITY EXPECTS STATE AND FEDERAL REIMBURSEMENT FOR MOST OF THE COSTS OF THE ERNST & YOUNG CONTRACT according to a staff report . The report also noted that while the city’s budget reserves are depleted, there is sufficient funding to pay out the contract.

    The city council is set to consider budget cuts and hold a public hearing on city spending priorities as part of its January 29th meeting
    ______________________________________________________

    You can reach Staff Writer Will Schmidt at 707-521-5207 or will.schmidt@pressdemocrat.com. On Twitter @usreports.

    NOBODY IS GOING BANKRUPT!

    The Press Democrat
    WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2018. Santa Rosa, California. PRESSDEMOCRAT.COM
    [From page 1.]

    SR tapping reserves for fire consultant
    By WILL SCHMIDT
    THE PRESS DEMOCRAT

    Santa Rosa will dig further into its budget reserves to pay an additional $813,000 to the disaster recovery consultant it retained after the October 2017 fires.

    The extension approved by the Santa Rosa City Council last week retains London-based consulting firm Ernst & Young through May and brings the total maximum value of the contract to $2.3 million. The cost of the extension was not included in the city’s current budget forecast, which had estimated Santa Rosa would have $6.5 million in reserves.

    The cost of fire damage and the resulting recovery efforts have eaten into the city’s reserve funding and exacerbated the strain of Santa Rosa’s existing budget deficit, though the city’s funding woes were buoyed somewhat by the passage of a quarter-cent sales tax hike approved by voters in November. That tax increase will take effect in April.

    Ernst & Young, which has an office in San Francisco, was hired in December 2017 to help local officials assess damage from the 2017 wildfires, request reimbursement from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and represent the city in [reimbursement] talks with FEMA and the California Office Of Emergency Services. Ernst & Young also worked with the city and another outside adviser, Hagerty Consulting, to assess the cities unmet disaster needs, a figure estimated at about $400 million.

    Much of Ernst & Young’s efforts have been behind the scenes, but the city recently revealed an online tracker developed in coordination with the consultant (http:/bit.ly/SRFEMA) reflecting the city’s disaster recovery requests [for reimbursement] to FEMA.

    The city has documented 32 projects with a combined estimated damage of about 66.5 million. FEMA has reimbursed about $2.8 in disaster costs so far. Ernst & Young will continue to help the city appeal four requests [for reimbursement] for about $17 million that FEMA initially deemed ineligible for reimbursement.

    City Manager Sean McGlynn told the city council last week that the contract extension would be the last one between Santa Rosa and Ernst & Young for this disaster recovery [reimbursement] contract. He noted that Santa Rosa’s efforts to secure reimbursements will be far from finished once the contract is up.

    “There is going to be a huge amount of time and energy spent by staff in managing this.” McGlynn said.

    The city expects state and federal reimbursement for most of the costs of the Ernst & Young contract according to a staff report . The report also noted that while the city’s budget reserves are depleted, there is sufficient funding to pay out the contract.

    The city council is set to consider budget cuts and hold a public hearing on city spending priorities as part of its January 29th meeting
    __________________________________________________ _________________

    You can reach Staff Writer Will Schmidt at 707-521-5207 or will.schmidt@pressdemocrat.com. On Twitter @usreports.

    NOBODY IS GOING BANKRUPT!

    The Press Democrat
    WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2018. Santa Rosa, California. PRESSDEMOCRAT.COM
    [From page 1.]

    SR tapping reserves for fire consultant
    By WILL SCHMIDT
    THE PRESS DEMOCRAT

    Santa Rosa will dig further into its budget reserves to pay an additional $813,000 to the disaster recovery consultant it retained after the October 2017 fires.

    The extension approved by the Santa Rosa City Council last week retains London-based consulting firm Ernst & Young through May and brings the total maximum value of the contract to $2.3 million. The cost of the extension was not included in the city’s current budget forecast, which had estimated Santa Rosa would have $6.5 million in reserves.

    The cost of fire damage and the resulting recovery efforts have eaten into the city’s reserve funding and exacerbated the strain of Santa Rosa’s existing budget deficit, though the city’s funding woes were buoyed somewhat by the passage of a quarter-cent sales tax hike approved by voters in November. That tax increase will take effect in April.

    Ernst & Young, which has an office in San Francisco, was hired in December 2017 to help local officials assess damage from the 2017 wildfires, request reimbursement from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and represent the city in [reimbursement] talks with FEMA and the California Office Of Emergency Services. Ernst & Young also worked with the city and another outside adviser, Hagerty Consulting, to assess the cities unmet disaster needs, a figure estimated at about $400 million.

    Much of Ernst & Young’s efforts have been behind the scenes, but the city recently revealed an online tracker developed in coordination with the consultant (http:/bit.ly/SRFEMA) reflecting the city’s disaster recovery requests [for reimbursement] to FEMA.

    The city has documented 32 projects with a combined estimated damage of about 66.5 million. FEMA has reimbursed about $2.8 in disaster costs so far. Ernst & Young will continue to help the city appeal four requests [for reimbursement] for about $17 million that FEMA initially deemed ineligible for reimbursement.

    City Manager Sean McGlynn told the city council last week that the contract extension would be the last one between Santa Rosa and Ernst & Young for this disaster recovery [reimbursement] contract. He noted that Santa Rosa’s efforts to secure reimbursements will be far from finished once the contract is up.

    “There is going to be a huge amount of time and energy spent by staff in managing this.” McGlynn said.

    The city expects state and federal reimbursement for most of the costs of the Ernst & Young contract according to a staff report . The report also noted that while the city’s budget reserves are depleted, there is sufficient funding to pay out the contract.

    The city council is set to consider budget cuts and hold a public hearing on city spending priorities as part of its January 29th meeting
    ________________________________________________________

    You can reach Staff Writer Will Schmidt at 707-521-5207 or will.schmidt@pressdemocrat.com. On Twitter @usreports.

    NOBODY IS GOING BANKRUPT!

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